Subscribe via RSS Feed

OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions

Background

The OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions (OECD Anti-Bribery Convention) came into force in 1999. Membership in this Convention is a pre-condition for membership in the OECD. As of April 2012, there were 39 Parties to the Convention: the 34 OECD members, plus Argentina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Russia, and South Africa.

In 2011, Colombia and Russia became the 39th and 40th Members of the OECD Working Group on Bribery in International Business Transactions (Working Group on Bribery – WGB), respectively. While the Convention entered into force in Russia in April 2012, Colombia is still in the process of acceding to the Convention.

The Working Group on Bribery is responsible for monitoring the implementation and enforcement of the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention. In addition, the WGB is actively engaging with major emerging economies not parties to the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention, in particular China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Thailand. The engagement with China, India and Indonesia was strengthened in November 2010 by the G20’s adoption of an Anti-Corruption Action Plan, which calls on G20 countries to criminalize bribery of foreign public officials and by 2012 to more actively engage with the Working Group on Bribery, or ratify the OECD Anti-Corruption Convention.

 


ACFID Logo
TI Australia is committed to complying with ACFID's Code of Conduct and the Code’s complaints handling process.