July 2009 (#100)


In this update:

  • Australia slips in OECD Anti-Bribery Convention 2009 Assessment
  • ‘Matching Measures to Risk’, Philip Moss, Integrity Commissioner
  • ACLEI Parliamentary Joint Committee Inquiry
  • 2009 Global Corruption Barometer (GCB) released
  • Politics and Corruption in the UK

Australia slips in OECD Anti-Bribery Convention 2009 Assessment

Only four countries – Germany, Norway, Switzerland and the United States – have been serious in their efforts to enforce the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention, according to Transparency International. All the other countries in a sample of 36 were found substantially wanting in their enforcement progress, even though they had all signed the Convention. According to the report, barriers included antiquated bribery laws, political interference, and poorly funded regulators. The OECD Convention makes a commitment for signatories to ban foreign bribery by companies based on their soil. It has been signed, to date, by 38 countries. Ten countries were held to be achieving ‘moderate’ achievement of the Convention commitments. These included France, Japan and the United Kingdom. Countries criticised for having next to no enforcement whatsoever included Australia, Brazil, Canada, Ireland and Poland.

‘Matching Measures to Risk’, Philip Moss, Integrity Commissioner

On 12 June 2009 Mr Philip Moss, Integrity Commissioner, Australian Commission for Law Enforcement Integrity, gave an important speech about corruption issues at a Corruption Prevention Network (CPN) Seminar hosted by the Australian Tax Office. Click on the link to read his speech.

ACLEI Parliamentary Joint Committee Inquiry

The Parliamentary Joint Committee on ACLEI has commenced an Inquiry that includes, among other things, examining ACLEI’s present jurisdiction, functions and resources.

2009 Global Corruption Barometer (GCB) released

The 2009 Global Corruption Barometer, a global public opinion survey released on 3 June 2009 by Transparency International, found that over half of those polled believe that the private sector uses bribes to influence public policy, laws and regulations. The TI website notes that, �Half of respondents expressed a willingness to pay a premium to buy from corruption-free companies…The business-related findings of the Barometer send a powerful signal to the private sector and provide yet another incentive -in addition to the legal, reputational and financial risks of corruption- for companies to prove that they are clean and to communicate this clearly to the public.�

Politics and Corruption in the UK

The TI website notes that, �The latest worldwide opinion poll exploring citizens� views and experiences of corruption reveals disturbing findings for the UK, a country often considered squeaky clean. The 2009 Global Corruption Barometer (GCB)�documents the public�s experience of bribery and their perception of corruption across key sectors of British public life…The Barometer reveals the extent to which key sectors of British public life � and politics in particular – were seen to be tainted by corruption before the peers-for-sale and MPs� expenses scandals came to light.�